Lakeside Arts Blog

Interview with Didy Veldman, creator of 'The Knot'

Audiences across the UK are being invited to join a wedding party in the new dance production The Knot which tours this autumn. Created by internationally renowned choreographer Didy Veldman, The Knot looks at the modern-day phenomenon of the ‘perfect’ marriage party.  

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Writing Competition

Calling all princes and princesses, fiery dragons, and dancing fairies! We invite you to write your very own fairy tale. From wicked witches in gingerbread houses, to golden geese in giants’ palaces, we want you to create your own story – what far, far away land will you take us to? 

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Interview with Oddsocks Prodcutions

An interview with Oddsocks Director, Andy Barrow and Dom Gee Burch playing Prospero and Caliban, Capulet and Mercutio in Oddsocks’ tour of The Tempest and Romeo and Juliet touring until September 2018

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Fairy Tales Series - Snow White

The story modern audiences now recognise as Snow White is perhaps one of the most archetypal fairy tales to be found, but it is not without a gruesome past… When the tale was first published by the Brothers Grimm in 1812, the evil queen was described as being Snow White’s mother; for the following publication in 1857, it was decided that distancing the evil queen to instead be Snow White’s stepmother was more palatable – especially when the queen wanted to cannibalise Snow White!

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Fairy Tales Series - Little Red Riding Hood

As with most fairy tales, there are several versions of the story of Little Red Riding-hood. In each of the versions, the premise of the story remains the same: a girl who typically wears a red hooded cape (as in Perrault’s version) or cap (hence Little Red-Cap in the Grimm’s version) encounters a wolf on her way to visit her grandmother, naïvely tells him where she is going, then becomes distracted by picking flowers. 

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Fairy Tales Series - Sleeping Beauty

The first recorded version of the tale now commonly known as Sleeping Beauty was by the Neapolitan poet, Giambattista Basile. Entitled Sun, Moon, and Talia, the story is far more disturbing than its later editions – and it is this version which is here recounted. In later versions of the story, the more gruesome aspects of the tale are either changed or removed, with the Grimm’s record of Little Brier-Rose forming our modern narrative.

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Fairy Tales Series - Cinderella

The tale of Cinderella is one of the oldest and most varied of fairy tales. Whilst the names and circumstances of the characters have changed over time, the key elements of a lost possession and a quest for its owner, as well as a marriage to rise above one’s class-station remain the same. The first record of such a story can be traced back to Greece in the sixth century BCE.

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Fairy Tales Series - Rapunzel

The ‘happily ever after’ ending of Rapunzel must have seemed a long time coming Rapunzel. In each version of the tale, the story begins with the poor child being traded away for a plant before she is even born (sometimes a type of lettuce known as rapunzel, as in Grimm’s version, other times parsley, as in Giambattista Basile’s earlier edition), and then being named after it as a permanent reminder of her parent’s transgressions. 

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Viking Stories - Leicester

The Thurcaston Hoard was found at Thurcaston, outside of Leicester. The coins are dated to around the time that Lady Æthelflæd of Mercia brought an army to Leicester to bring the town back into Mercian control and out from under the Danelaw. The following is a fictional account of how this event could have influenced the burial of the Thurcaston Hoard.

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Viking Stories - Torksey & Repton

What would come to be known as the Great Heathen Army – an army of approximately 2000 Vikings – camped first at Torksey, and then at Repton. Throughout the winter of 872 – 873 CE, Torksey became home to the Viking invaders. By the following winter, the army had moved south, sailing their longships down the River Trent to Repton, where they over-wintered until spring in 874 CE. The evidence of their encampments leaves tantalising clues as to who they were and what they did. The following is a fictional account of what life might have been like within the Great Heathen Army.

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