Lakeside Arts

The University of Nottingham Museum

Located next to the Djanogly Art Gallery, the Museum is open to the general public and admission is free.

Opening Times:

Monday - Saturday 11am - 5pm

Sundays 12noon - 4pm*

The University of Nottingham Museum was opened in 1933 when Felix Oswald, a Roman pottery specialist donated his collection to the University.

Oswald's collection includes the material he excavated at the Roman settlement of Margidunum at Bingham in Nottinghamshire and the internationally important collection of Samian pottery.

Events

Unknown, Virtually: Nottingham's Sandstone Caves - Wednesday 23 January

The Hallaton Treasure: An Iron Age Mystery - Wednesday 27 February

Working with Archaeological Objects - Saturday 23 March

The Felix Oswald Samian Collection

urn

Felix Oswald, an early pioneer of Roman pottery studies in Britain, established a collection of samian ware from his excavations at Margidunum (Nottinghamshire) and also acquired a substantial collection from the French antiquarian Albert-Edward Plicque. The bulk of Oswald's collection was donated to the University of Nottingham (the remainder to the University of Durham) and the collection constitutes a major, yet underused, resource for Roman pottery studies. 

Why not search through the free-to-access Felix Oswald Samian Project Database.

           

The Museum also contains a number of other collections that have been donated to it over the last century. Feel free to drop by and have a look around.

Please contact the Museum Keeper (Clare Pickersgill) for further information about the Museum and collections.

clare.pickersgill@nottingham.ac.uk

*Please call the Box Office (0115 846 7777) or check the website for Bank Holiday opening times

Previous Exhibitions

Roman Sexuality; Images, Myths and Meanings

A famous Roman artefact once considered too shocking to be exhibited came to The University of Nottingham as part of a major exhibition in early 2011.

The Warren Cup, a silver cup decorated with scenes of male homosexual love, was recently featured in the BBC series A History of the World in 100 Objects and has its permanent home in the British Museum. It is only the second time the cup has left the Museum to be displayed outside London.

The cup will form the centrepiece of a three-month exhibition Roman Sexuality: Images, Myths and Meanings running at the University’s Weston Gallery at the Lakeside Arts Centre, which brings together a wide variety of artefacts and images from Roman art and archaeology and investigates what they meant to those who made and used them.

About Us

The University of Nottingham Museum was opened in 1933 when Felix Oswald, a Roman pottery specialist donated his collection to the University.

Oswald's collection included the material he excavated at the Roman settlement of Margidunum at Bingham in Nottinghamshire and the internationally important collection of Samian pottery.

Masclus

Decorated Samian pottery bowl form Dr30 with intra-decorated signature by Masclus i, a South Gaulish potter who worked between AD 50 and 70 (from Margidunum).

The Museum also contains a number of other collections that have been donated over the last century. The objects cover a wide period from the Palaeolithic (250-70,000 years ago) to the post-medieval period and mainly come from the East Midlands.

The wide variety of objects reflects the everyday lives of people living in this area over this wide period of time.

There is also a small display of objects from other countries including Egypt, Italy and Cyprus.

The Collection

The University of Nottingham Museum has a collection of archaeological artefacts from the East Midlands (Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire and Leicestershire). The wide variety of objects on display in the Museum reflects  the everyday lives of people living in the East Midlands from the Palaeolithic to the post medieval period.

Prehistoric

The Museum contains substantial holdings of Palaeolithic and Neolithic objects. The majority of objects from these periods are lithics and axes.

axes

The Bronze Age collection includes both metalwork, notably from Attenborough, and pottery.

The Iron Age is represented mainly by pottery and includes a local type series of fabrics.

Roman

Cooking pots and utensils

There is a wide variety of artefacts from a variety of Roman sites including the village at Margidunum, the cemetery at Ancaster and the Villa at Southwell.

Anglo-Saxon

Saxon Brooch

The Anglo Saxon collection contains metalwork, including brooches, and pottery from the cemeteries at Willoughby-on-the-Wolds, Ancaster and Newark.

Medieval and post medieval

Medieval building materials and pottery as well as a variety of everyday objects from this period can be found in the Museum.  Post medieval pottery from the Nottingham caves have contributed to a type and fabric series of medieval and post medieval pottery.

Beyond the region

small Etruscan urn

There is a small quantity of material from other countries including Etruscan artefacts from Italy, Bronze Age pottery from Cyprus, jewellery and pottery from Egypt and Greek and Roman coins.

Previous Research

Medieval tile makers working at Keighton, University Park Campus, Nottingham: representation through ceramic technologies. This work was undertaken using the University's Microanalysis Research Facility.